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Interview with Anthula Boosalis

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A. BOOSALIS: Her address is 4545 Valley View Road.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Can you give me your place and date of birth?
A. BOOSALIS: 1909, 18th of December.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: And where were you born?
A. BOOSALIS: Niata, Greece.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. What was your maiden name?
A. BOOSALIS: [Mirras].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. And now you are widowed, right?
A. BOOSALIS: Yes.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. What was your husband’s first name and…?
A. BOOSALIS: George N. Boosalis.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: And he was…
A. BOOSALIS: And he was Nick to his father.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Nick to his father.
A. BOOSALIS: Yes.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Where was he born?
A. BOOSALIS: In Niata.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay, and his birthday?
A. BOOSALIS: His birthday was November 20, 1898.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. What is your father’s name and where he was born?
A. BOOSALIS: My father was born in Niata. He was a doctor and I don’t remember the year he was born.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: How about when he died?
A. BOOSALIS: He died about… I don’t remember exactly. It has to be 20 years ago.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay, and what’s his name?
A. BOOSALIS: His name was Dr. Demetrius Mirras.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. Was he like a general practitioner?
A. BOOSALIS: Yes.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: General practitioner.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: He used to do what now?
A. BOOSALIS: My father?
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Yeah.
A. BOOSALIS: He was a doctor.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: He was a doctor but he used to go by horse, you said?
A. BOOSALIS: Those years, he used to go by horse. They used to come and pick him up, and take him to the sick person. He used to go to all the little towns around and he got one big [unintelligible - 00:01:28] his father got him [unintelligible - 00:01:33] and then he used to put him up [unintelligible - 00:01:36] and go to the next stop and then stay there and the next day just come home.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: What kind of pay did he get?
A. BOOSALIS: What kind of pay?
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Yeah.
A. BOOSALIS: Pay. He was a good man, no pay. The people, they have to pay you. Most of the people, they used… those years in the small towns, they had those [unintelligible - 00:01:58] they used to call them and they used to do it with [unintelligible - 00:02:04].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Twigs, branches?
A. BOOSALIS: Branches, yeah. A lot of branches. So they used to go and pick up branches and food so we can [unintelligible - 00:02:12]. Most of the people, they didn’t have any money. So he was a very good Christian.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Did he get… like they give him food or…?
A. BOOSALIS: Sometimes, he would bring some loaf of bread, a big loaf of bread but he never wanted to take away from the people that didn’t have. But the people that have, it’s okay.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. Did he have a nickname?
A. BOOSALIS: His father used to call him [unintelligible - 00:02:41] the nickname. But my father did have a nickname but they know he was a doctor so everybody knew him. So his father used to call him [unintelligible - 00:02:51] because his hair was like silk.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Oh.
A. BOOSALIS: Blonde like my friend Doris. So that’s why [unintelligible - 00:03:01].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: I didn’t know that. Okay. Give me your mother’s first and maiden name.
A. BOOSALIS: My mother’s was Marina [Filipangos]. That was my mother’s maiden name. And then, in fact, my father met her when she was going to school. And he loves her and he wanted to marry her from the beginning. He said, [unintelligible - 00:03:23]. They fell in love and they got married, and she came down to the [unintelligible - 00:03:32] but she died very young.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Did she?
A. BOOSALIS: Twenty-nine.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: What did she die from?
A. BOOSALIS: When she died, it was really too bad because they didn’t know it was just gallbladder.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Oh, gallbladder.
A. BOOSALIS: They didn’t know enough to save her.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: What was her hometown?
A. BOOSALIS: Athens.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Athens. But do you know when she was born in Athens? Do you know?
A. BOOSALIS: I don’t know when she was born. [Unintelligible - 00:03:56].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: What year did they get married? Do you remember?
A. BOOSALIS: They must have been married before… before 1898, 1898, ’96, I don’t know. I don’t remember.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. That sounds good.
A. BOOSALIS: Because my brother was… one of them was born in late 1899 and the other one was born in 1909… I mean, 1901.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Now, were they both buried in…?
A. BOOSALIS: Niata.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: …in Niata?
A. BOOSALIS: Yeah.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. And name your brothers and sisters.
A. BOOSALIS: It’s so hard to remember them all. The ones that are alive or the ones that are dead?
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: All of them. Both of them.
A. BOOSALIS: Both alive and dead. With the first mother, we had my sister Nina [unintelligible - 00:04:51], my brother John and my brother [unintelligible - 00:04:54] and then it was my sister [unintelligible - 00:04:57] and then me.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: [00:05:00] And then mother passed away. And after seven years, my father got married to this lovely woman. She was really a nice person. She was an [adopted relative]. And she had… with the second mother, [unintelligible - 00:05:17], and one she died, she died very young, and then Peter, then it was my brother George, and my sister Fifi. The second time, there was about six of us the second time, too.
A. BOOSALIS: So we were altogether 11 or 12.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: And where was she from?
A. BOOSALIS: She was from a [unintelligible - 00:05:42] town not too far from Molai, they call it. It’s not too far from Niata, and a little bigger town.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Little bigger. And what was her name?
A. BOOSALIS: Her name was Aphrodite.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. I’m curious about your hometown. How big was your hometown? Can you give me like a…?
A. BOOSALIS: Eleven hundred, fifteen hundred people.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Fifteen hundred people.
A. BOOSALIS: Yeah, something like that.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: And not too big or it’s quite bigger than the…?
A. BOOSALIS: Not too much because a lot of people… there were a lot of them here. The half of Niata was here.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: In Minneapolis?
A. BOOSALIS: In Minneapolis and Rochester.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: In Rochester.
A. BOOSALIS: Not Rochester, Minnesota, Rochester, New York.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: New York. Okay. All right.
A. BOOSALIS: They had a lot of them but a lot had left. But now they’re coming back. A lot of them build homes and they’ll stay. It’s getting much bigger again.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Has it gotten more modern over there, become more modern?
A. BOOSALIS: They were modern all their lives, because you know why? The people from here, they used to send them money. So they really used to live pretty good.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Now, Niata is close to what big town or what area?
A. BOOSALIS: The big town near Niata? Molai is the next big town.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: [Unintelligible - 00:06:48].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Is it [unintelligible - 00:06:52] by province?
A. BOOSALIS: If you go to Sparta, that’s a bigger town. Close to Sparta but 35 miles from…
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay, south…
A. BOOSALIS: Yeah, south.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: … east, or... south. Do you remember?
A. BOOSALIS: Oh, my gosh.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: I don’t know if I can.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: But it’s close to Sparta [laughs].
A. BOOSALIS: Close to Sparta. It’s all I know but 35 miles of distance. That’s the biggest town they have close.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. Do you remember your grandparents?
A. BOOSALIS: I remember my grandfather and my grandmother, not my mother’s, my father’s.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Your father’s.
A. BOOSALIS: Because they used to live next door. I remember when my grandfather died, I was very young and then all our visitors were around. They like to have this fireplace and they sit around and then we were boiling something and one of my cousins, I guess, pushed me and I got a big burn here. That’s what I remember when papou died.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Oh.
A. BOOSALIS: My grandmother died a little bit later.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: That I remember.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Your dad’s second wife, did she have parents or were they [unintelligible - 00:07:46]?
A. BOOSALIS: Oh, yes. She had nice parents, yeah. Her father was a doctor, too, and she was from a loving family, nice. A nice person. She was wonderful.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: That’s a big responsibility, coming with six children.
A. BOOSALIS: Six children. Yeah, it is, but she was so very nice.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: That’s good.
A. BOOSALIS: Yeah. I really like her because she never separated us. She started to keep us like we all belong to her.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Yeah.
A. BOOSALIS: And it was a good feeling.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: That’s good.
A. BOOSALIS: It was a good feeling. Yeah.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Tell me, do you remember your nouno and nouna?
A. BOOSALIS: Oh, no. I don’t remember because my nouna was my real mother’s brother and he left and he went to Paris and he married a French girl and he stayed there all his life, so I never remembered him.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: He never raised you?
A. BOOSALIS: I was very young. No.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: No.
A. BOOSALIS: No. She had one brother and two sisters. One of the sisters, [unintelligible - 00:08:46], when my mother died, she kept me for a couple of years and I used to call her mother. I felt that it was my mother.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: How old were you when she died?
A. BOOSALIS: Two years old.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Two years old? Yeah.
A. BOOSALIS: Two years old and I don’t remember a thing. The only thing I remember even today, it has stayed in my mind, I remember a woman, a lady laid down with a big [unintelligible - 00:09:07]. And somebody was holding me but clearly, I can’t see but I can see somebody laying there. That’s what I remember of my mother, nothing else.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: Nothing.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Yeah. Now, tell me about your marriage.
A. BOOSALIS: My marriage [laughs]. I got a very happy marriage. It was 57 years.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: How you met your husband.
A. BOOSALIS: How I met my husband. [Laughs] My sister-in-law, George’s younger sister when she was in Greece, she was close to my age so we were good friends.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: What’s her name?
A. BOOSALIS: [Unintelligible - 00:09:42].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: And we were good friends so she wanted me to marry George [laughs]. So she got George here and then told him to come down. He was 15 years in this country. So she said, “Come down and we got somebody for you. [00:10:00] And if you don’t like her, you don’t have to date her.” So George came down and I guess we liked each and we did well but she was the instigator, I’d say.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: No prika?
A. BOOSALIS: No. I wasn’t for sale.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: [Laughs].
A. BOOSALIS: I wasn’t for sale and I would never marry anybody that… George never wanted it. He never wanted any.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: How did he come to the United States?
A. BOOSALIS: His uncle brought him. He didn’t want to come. He was crying. When he was a little boy, he still remembers his uncle wanted to bring him here and then he was crying. He said, “I don’t want to leave my mother. I don’t want to go.” But he came very young. He was 16 years old. He came back 15 years later [unintelligible - 00:10:44].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: What age difference is there between you?
A. BOOSALIS: Twelve.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Twelve years, okay.
A. BOOSALIS: Twelve years.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: So you didn’t know him at all?
A. BOOSALIS: I know the family.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: You just knew the family?
A. BOOSALIS: Not him.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Yeah.
A. BOOSALIS: Not him.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: And then what did he do when he came here at 16 years old?
A. BOOSALIS: He had an uncle, John [unintelligible - 00:10:56] and he had the [unintelligible - 00:10:59] Café and his uncle wanted to send him to school, wanted to send him to university but George wasn’t too much… he didn’t care to go. George was still, I suppose, lonesome. But he went to high school, senior, where he did very well. And he had really good merits. Too bad you didn’t interview him because he’d remember a lot of old Minneapolis. And then his uncle had this café and he went to school for a while and then he started working with Uncle John [unintelligible - 00:11:27]. And then after he died, he left the café to George and the other cousin, some other one, yeah. But it was in an old town, [unintelligible - 00:11:39]. It wasn’t in a good section so it wasn’t worth [unintelligible - 00:11:42] but it was okay. And then he worked in the Fountain Café.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Which was on…?
A. BOOSALIS: Lake Street, Chicago and Lake.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Lake Street. When you married him, was that the restaurant he had?
A. BOOSALIS: No. He had the one, the [unintelligible - 00:11:55] Café.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: The [unintelligible - 00:11:56] Café, that’s where he was working.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Yeah.
A. BOOSALIS: [Unintelligible - 00:11:59].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: And then he brought his brothers over, too, here?
A. BOOSALIS: Well, he brought his brothers before we got married.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: [Unintelligible - 00:12:07] came first in 1923 and then Ted and then Jimmy. Jimmy couldn’t come, I think. He went to Mexico and he stayed for a year in Mexico and then he came to the States to his brother. And he was always saying, “I ought to die. I didn’t bring everybody.” Because he left one sister and one brother down there.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: And the sister never did come?
A. BOOSALIS: No. She got a son in Canada.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: She brought the son in Canada and the brother never came.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: [Unintelligible - 00:12:40].
A. BOOSALIS: His mother and his father died when George was very young.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. I think we’ve talked about George. You gave me his name, his place of birth, and his birthday. Did you give me his birthday? Do you remember?
A. BOOSALIS: Yeah.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: I think I did.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: In 1898.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: 1898. Did he have a nickname?
A. BOOSALIS: They used to call him [unintelligible - 00:13:01]. That’s what [unintelligible - 00:13:03] but I don’t think anybody knew it here.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: But what does that mean?
A. BOOSALIS: That’s what his father… nothing, nothing. I don’t know. I don’t know how they got those names.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Yeah.
A. BOOSALIS: Yeah.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay, how about your koumbaro at the wedding? Do you remember who that was?
A. BOOSALIS: Oh, gosh, just a moment. Let me think. My koumbaro was the first cousin of Mary Boosalis [unintelligible - 00:13:27] but I don’t remember the last name. I forgot his last name.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: And when we came here, Mary Boosalis [unintelligible - 00:13:38] baptized George because they were first cousins, of course. So that’s when we became koumbara with Mary.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: That’s good.
A. BOOSALIS: [Unintelligible - 00:13:46] It was George [Na], the mother.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: [Unintelligible - 00:13:51] was the first name but I don’t remember her last name.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: As we go along and you remember the name, we’ll just insert it there. Okay. How about your father-in-law? Was he from the same place?
A. BOOSALIS: From the same. He’s from Niata but he died. My father-in-law was dead.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: By the time you got married? Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: By the time we got married.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: How about your mother-in-law?
A. BOOSALIS: My mother-in-law lived for a long time. She was a nice person. She died 85 years old.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Was she from the same village, too?
A. BOOSALIS: Yes.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. Did they just grow up together and they married?
A. BOOSALIS: They grew up together and they got married.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. Now, you’re to give me your children’s name and place of birth and their date in order.
A. BOOSALIS: You have Giorgio. He was born 1932, October 11. Marina was born two years later, 1934, November 15. [00:15:00] And Barbie was born 1939, June 8. And June 9 was the day we got married with George and then we wanted Barbie to be the same anniversary but she came about an hour earlier. And I remember talking to Dr. [unintelligible - 00:15:17]. I said, “Why can’t you pull her at 12 o’clock, keeping her for now?” And he started laughing, saying, “No, I can’t do that.” And then George passed away last June the same day we got married, the 9th of June.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: He did? I didn’t know that.
A. BOOSALIS: Yeah, yeah.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: He wanted you to remember that.
A. BOOSALIS: I guess so.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: The day you got married and the day he died.
A. BOOSALIS: The day he left, yeah.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: I can never forget.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Now, do you remember your children’s godparents? Giorgio [unintelligible - 00:15:49].
A. BOOSALIS: Giorgio got Mary Boosalis [unintelligible - 00:15:51].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: Marina has [foreign language - 00:15:57].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: [Unintelligible - 00:16:03] was her name. And Barbie’s nouna is… nouno, he baptized her, was [unintelligible - 00:16:12].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: No, I don’t remember [unintelligible - 00:16:17].
A. BOOSALIS: Do you remember [unintelligible - 00:16:19]. She’s gone.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: No.
A. BOOSALIS: No [unintelligible - 00:16:22] she has a sister. She married [unintelligible - 00:16:28].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Yes.
A. BOOSALIS: [Unintelligible - 00:16:30]. And the father baptized Barbie.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay, good. Do you remember the names of the children that you have baptized?
A. BOOSALIS: Me?
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Yes.
A. BOOSALIS: I only have one, [unintelligible - 00:16:42].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: Yeah.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: How about your husband though? He had some?
A. BOOSALIS: I think that’s the only one we have.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay, [unintelligible - 00:16:50]. Now, do you remember the date that you arrived in the United States?
A. BOOSALIS: Hold on. I baptized one in Greece. I forgot, yeah.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: No. Harry was George’s [unintelligible - 00:17:01].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: But I baptized one in Greece. That’s all. It was Giorgio [unintelligible - 00:05] the last name.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: And I baptized him.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: All right. Do you remember the date that you arrived in the United States?
A. BOOSALIS: 1917, the 4th of September.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. Do you remember the ship and where you were docked?
A. BOOSALIS: That was an Italian ship. I wish I could remember.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: I forgot [unintelligible - 00:17:37].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Well, if you think of it, we’ll come back and… okay. When you came in the United States, did you have any trouble coming in with the name of Boosalis or did you change your name?
A. BOOSALIS: There was no problem.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. Because your husband had already been a United States citizen.
A. BOOSALIS: Yeah, he was an American citizen so I had no problem.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. Okay, you came because you’re married so that answers that question.
A. BOOSALIS: Oh, yeah.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Did you receive any education or occupation related to… just before you came here? Before you came, were you educated at all?
A. BOOSALIS: In Greece?
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Uh-huh.
A. BOOSALIS: Well, I went up to sixth grade. Not too much.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. How about when you got here? I know you’re a fantastic seamstress.
A. BOOSALIS: I was dumb. I should’ve gone to school more. I stopped going to school and then I became pregnant and I was lonesome and I don’t want to leave George alone. I mean, I just couldn’t [unintelligible - 00:18:34].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Yeah.
A. BOOSALIS: So I in that home sewed. I never went to school because I was very good [unintelligible - 00:18:40] my American citizen paper and I’m sorry I never did.
SPEAKER 3: So how did you then learn to sew so well?
A. BOOSALIS: By myself.
SPEAKER 3: By yourself? You just decided you wanted to sew and have…?
A. BOOSALIS: No. I had the girls and I wanted to make them good uniforms. I mean, they’re just cute little things so I just learned by myself. I don’t know.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: Which patterns and things like that.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: What special interests do you have here and hobbies besides the sewing? Do you have any?
A. BOOSALIS: I like to cook.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Well, I know that you’re very good with helping people when they need help. I guess I would call that a hobby.
A. BOOSALIS: I would actually call it a hobby.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: You were very active in the [unintelligible - 00:19:19]?
A. BOOSALIS: Yeah, I was very active with lots of those. Yes, I did a lot of work with [unintelligible - 00:19:24].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Can you think of any important things during your life that you would like to relive? We talked about getting married. You have three girls. You have how many grandchildren?
A. BOOSALIS: Thirteen.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Thirteen grandchildren. Anything else that you would call important, something that maybe happened with you and your husband? I know that your husband is one of our earliest Greek settlers here in the United States.
A. BOOSALIS: Yes. I don’t remember [unintelligible - 00:19:51].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Huh?
A. BOOSALIS: Like what?
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Any honorees or anything. Weren’t you chosen… [00:20:00] You were chosen [unintelligible - 00:20:00].
A. BOOSALIS: No.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. Did you work, Aunt [unintelligible - 00:20:08]?
A. BOOSALIS: No. I never did because George never wanted me to work. He wanted me to raise the children. I had three girls and I did everything for them and then George used to come every day for lunch.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: He used to like home because he did not like to eat in the pantry because everybody was in the field and he wanted his sister here.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Yeah.
A. BOOSALIS: Those years, he used to like to have Greek coffee after he ate his lunch. With Greek coffee, he’d stay about an hour or so and then he’ll go back to work and close the store. But I never worked.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. How late did he work?
A. BOOSALIS: Well, sometimes he had up to 11 o’clock and the lady decided to move him [unintelligible - 00:20:46] at 8 o’clock. He had a Monday off and then after a while, he decided to close on Sunday and he had his Sunday off because he will always like… he did a lot of work for the church [unintelligible - 00:21:05] very good things. Always, he was very good and very easygoing.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: And I know when they built the new church, he was very instrumental and then…
A. BOOSALIS: He was three years as president at that time and he was good because he never was the type to say, “I did it.” When he was the president years ago, he said, “We did it.” I couldn’t do it alone without you.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Right.
A. BOOSALIS: He was really a very easy person.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Because I know his name came up with one of the other people I interviewed when they talked about the church and how he was instrumental really in bringing everybody out to our…
A. BOOSALIS: Yes, very much so, very much so, yeah.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Because he was a very peaceful person.
A. BOOSALIS: Yes, very peaceful and very easygoing and he never, like I say, he never irritates people.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Yeah.
A. BOOSALIS: He had a gift to serve peace to everybody.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Yeah.
A. BOOSALIS: Yeah, because he was… he did a lot of things at that time.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: That’s good.
A. BOOSALIS: He enjoyed doing it. He didn’t mind doing it at all. Yeah. So I don’t know.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: He used to tell me of a church. It was a beautiful church overlooking Lake Calhoun.
A. BOOSALIS: His name is down… where they put the names. They put them inside in some place down with the mayor. His name is there.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: That’s good.
A. BOOSALIS: [Unintelligible - 00:22:31] how they do that.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: I don’t know how they do that.
A. BOOSALIS: I don’t know how they did it but I know that, yeah, he was… that’s why he stayed for three years at that time. It was really nice. In those years, we had a lot of misunderstandings [unintelligible - 00:22:51]. We could have bought the whole thing for nothing. We paid $1000 for it. We had so much fight, a lot of fight. We met a lot of people [unintelligible - 00:23:09]. They want to stay there and look at the difference [unintelligible - 00:23:14] it will be a mess.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Yes.
A. BOOSALIS: Now, we got a beautiful church.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: It’s the church overlooking Lake Calhoun. And in fact, it was where the Pond Brothers first started. They were the first missionary here in Minneapolis. Yeah. I don’t know if you know that.
A. BOOSALIS: No.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: I teach Minneapolis history.
A. BOOSALIS: Oh, so you know it.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: [Laughter].
A. BOOSALIS: You should know more than I do. Yeah.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Well, okay. Now…
A. BOOSALIS: I taught the girls to be nice and not to do anything wrong. They all went to school. [Unintelligible - 00:23:46] always, you know, [unintelligible - 00:23:51].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Where did they graduate, Aunt [unintelligible - 00:23:53]?
A. BOOSALIS: Well, Georgia graduated from [unintelligible - 00:23:57]. She finished her degree after she got married. And Barbie was the same, business administration.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: That’s good. Now, Barbie’s husband does what then? I don’t know.
A. BOOSALIS: He’s a [unintelligible - 00:24:12].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay. And they have how many children?
A. BOOSALIS: Four.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Four.
A. BOOSALIS: They got three girls and a boy.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: And the three girls just finished. Caroline is going to finish Stanford this year. The older one, Diana, finished [unintelligible - 00:24:35]. And Andrea finished in Chicago, Northwest, an engineer. And the boy goes to Stanford.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: That’s great. That’s good.
A. BOOSALIS: Barbie’s. That’s Barbie’s. Marina [unintelligible - 00:24:45] got a doctor’s degree in chemical engineer and the other one is in business administration. The first one is in business and the last one, George, is an engineer with a master’s degree.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: [00:25:00] That’s good.
A. BOOSALIS: Georgia [unintelligible - 00:25:06] is in business and Stephanie is an engineer. And Paulette and Denise, Paulette is in home economics and Paulette is in economics.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: That’s great.
A. BOOSALIS: Well, they’ve worked pretty good.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: They’ve all done very well.
A. BOOSALIS: They’ve all done very well.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: That’s good.
A. BOOSALIS: So we only have George in [high school].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: [Laughter].
A. BOOSALIS: I’m very proud of them.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Yeah.
A. BOOSALIS: They’re all good kids.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: You should be very proud of them.
A. BOOSALIS: Yeah, I am. They’re all good kids.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Where are your sisters? Any of them alive here…
A. BOOSALIS: I have a sister… I have three sisters in Greece.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: And I have one sister here at [unintelligible - 00:25:50].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Okay.
A. BOOSALIS: And the brothers are all dead.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Yeah. It’s just the four of you left, huh?
A. BOOSALIS: Yeah.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Out of 12.
A. BOOSALIS: Yeah. Oh, my goodness. That will be five sisters.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Five sisters.
A. BOOSALIS: Five sisters, yeah.
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Yeah.
A. BOOSALIS: I’m the oldest. I’m the second and the [unintelligible - 00:26:14].
A. SPELIOPOULOUS: Yeah. That’s good. This concludes the oral history collection [unintelligible - 00:26:25] by Angie [unintelligible - 00:26:29] Spiropoulos. Date, the 28th of February, 1988.