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Interview with Hilding Anderson

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Hilding Anderson was born in 1905 in Sundsvall, Sweden. Working as a farmer in Sweden, he came to Fergus Falls, Minnesota, in 1926 with the help of his mother’s cousin. He worked for 40 years at Ohleen Dairy until he retired, serving for 27 years as a milkman along Lake Street.

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1:01:04

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World Region

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License Please contact American Swedish Institute staff for permissions not covered by this Creative Commons license.

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INTERVIEWER: [Unintelligible - 00:00:00] I’m member of the Archives and Library Oral History Project of the American Swedish Institute. Today, I have a well-known member of the institute Hilding Anderson. Well Hilding, would you tell us then when you were born and where you were born?
H. ANDERSON: 1905.
INTERVIEWER: At… What date was that?
H. ANDERSON: 3rd of June.
INTERVIEWER: June 3rd, okay.
H. ANDERSON: June 3rd, yeah.
INTERVIEWER: And where also you were born in?
H. ANDERSON: In [unintelligible - 00:00:33] my home there in [unintelligible - 00:00:36] I was born.
INTERVIEWER: Oh in the hospital.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah. In the hospital yeah.
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see, oh.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah, right, yeah.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So they had a little farm where I stay often. My father had a farm there and they stayed there then after that, you know, until I left there.
INTERVIEWER: How big a farm was it?
H. ANDERSON: Oh I couldn’t say. We had about four or five cows, maybe then two horses sometimes and it was pretty good.
INTERVIEWER: Did they raise crops there?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah.
INTERVIEWER: You raised some crops?
H. ANDERSON: Yes.
INTERVIEWER: He was a farmer then?
H. ANDERSON: He was a farmer then you know.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: And he rented the company called [unintelligible - 00:01:11]. Like they rented their farm. Around four or five farms they rented are owned. Like, the company owned.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: and we all rented from them. They see -- so they -- so my father had work and to pay the rent for the year and
INTERVIEWER: Mmm.
H. ANDERSON: In the woods, naturally. In the woods from the woods.
INTERVIEWER: Oh he also worked in the winter in the woods?
H. ANDERSON: That’s right.
INTERVIEWER: Okay.
H. ANDERSON: Cut timber and then make cook.
INTERVIEWER: Oh the charcoal, huh?
H. ANDERSON: Charcoal.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah, yeah.
H. ANDERSON: We did that.
INTERVIEWER: What kind of industry was that the company? Was that a mining company or?
H. ANDERSON: No, it’s just an ordinary company [unintelligible - 00:01:50].
INTERVIEWER: What were they making?
H. ANDERSON: They owned farmers like that… farms like that all over. That’s all they did.
INTERVIEWER: That’s all they had?
H. ANDERSON: That’s all they had there actually.
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see. They sold charcoal, I suppose then?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that’s right. In the winter time we haul the charcoal down to the nearest train. You know, they toss the coal down to the tools and put much in there.
INTERVIEWER: I see. I see. What was your father’s name?
H. ANDERSON: Vilhelm Andersen.
INTERVIEWER: Vilhelm Andersen.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that’s it.
INTERVIEWER: And your mother’s name?
H. ANDERSON: Alma Andersen.
INTERVIEWER: Is that her maiden name?
H. ANDERSON: That’s maiden… that’s right. No they were
INTERVIEWER: And there’s more…?
H. ANDERSON: Neiman. Neiman was her maiden name
INTERVIEWER: Okay.
H. ANDERSON: And she was related to my cousin here in Fergus Falls.
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see.
H. ANDERSON: So I worked here and there a little bit, all over there and I really never got through school. Definitely to…
INTERVIEWER: When did you finish school then?
H. ANDERSON: 13, at 13 years old when I finished school.
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see that’s… Did you go any further to any higher…?
H. ANDERSON: No I didn’t go any further then.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: It was… We needed money and help, you know,
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: help the father and help the farmers around there and…
INTERVIEWER: How many were in your family then?
H. ANDERSON: There were four kids.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm and how are you…
H. ANDERSON: I’m the oldest.
INTERVIEWER: You’re the oldest.
H. ANDERSON: And they’re all gone. They all passed away.
INTERVIEWER: They’ve always passed away.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:03:04] the walls now.
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see.
H. ANDERSON: My youngest brother was here visited and his wife here when we were here years ago,
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: but they all passed away.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: I got two nieces. That’s all I got left of them.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: So I go see them once in a while.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm. So after school then you will start working?
H. ANDERSON: Start working for everybody, you know. You want to make it for your daughters you know?
INTERVIEWER: Sure.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:03:28] 10 days, you know.
INTERVIEWER: Yes, yes.
H. ANDERSON: So I saw an ad in the paper that the big farmer far away from us, closer to town to [unintelligible - 00:03:42].
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So I answered that and maybe I could get a job there.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So I went on and he said he only perform until I see him and so I went down and saw him and I got to stay there for that summer then but I got so lonesome down there. I had a girlfriend in our home there and I couldn’t…
INTERVIEWER: Oh.
H. ANDERSON: His name was Madison and my girlfriend’s folks name was Madison.
INTERVIEWER: Oh.
H. ANDERSON: So I went over there. I worked there for the summer. I was lonesome. I didn’t like it down there.
INTERVIEWER: [Laughs]
H. ANDERSON: Close to town I had to take the food that they made on their farm down to town on Saturdays and stand there and sell that and
INTERVIEWER: Oh.
H. ANDERSON: stuff like that. I didn’t like that.
INTERVIEWER: How old were you then?
H. ANDERSON: I must’ve been 18.
INTERVIEWER: 18.
H. ANDERSON: 18, 19 yeah.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So then I took the bicycle and went home. I didn’t tell them or anything
INTERVIEWER: [Laughter].
H. ANDERSON: and took everything with me, ahead with me and went home. That was on a Saturday and on Sunday here comes this farmer with a horse yelling, bug me and asked me. I wouldn’t come back. I gave you $100 share in a month, he said. I’m going to cross a month then. I had 75. [00:05:00]
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm. Was that…?
H. ANDERSON: No I didn’t want to go back there so.
INTERVIEWER: Oh.
H. ANDERSON: Here comes my girlfriend and her sister coming to ask me, “My dad wanted to see you? He said if you want to come in and come and see him?” Sure, I will say, “okay, I will be there too.” So I come and ask my father first if - to ask my father first if you had to use help, if I had to stay home and, you know, help him? No he said. You’re going to be fine without him. He said you can go if you like, keep on. So there was my girlfriend. So I was thinking enough to go over there and so I went there. His neighbor Madison too went in.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So I went there and stayed there for the summer - next summer then.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: and then he was -- one guy there who lived there all the time he was married to one of the daughters that -- and him and I would go to the woods and cutting timber. We went together and he told me, “Why don’t you write to Eric Neiman?” Then it’s probably false.
INTERVIEWER: Oh.
H. ANDERSON: He knew him. They were the same age the two them and yeah, the same day I went home and wrote to him. The same evening, I wrote to him here. In two weeks, I have their tickets and they too, come here.
INTERVIEWER: Oh.
H. ANDERSON: Oh. So that’s how they come here.
INTERVIEWER: How they came here. Were you intended to stay here permanently then?
H. ANDERSON: No I said five years.
INTERVIEWER: Five years.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah and have come to [unintelligible - 00:06:29] where we took the boat then you know? There were two or three women there asking you, “Come back! Come back!” And when you come back, you know five years I said I’ll be back and there you got there…
INTERVIEWER: What did your girlfriend think when you left?
H. ANDERSON: She wrote to me like [unintelligible - 00:06:43] she wanted to come right after me. Right after it, I stepped in before you spend a couple of weeks, I got a letter from her saying can I come over to you? Well I didn’t know what I’m going to do with myself. I don’t even have a room in there with me.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So I wrote back and told her and I have said, “I’m going to ask grandpa”. She said, “If I can borrow money from him and
INTERVIEWER: [Laughter].
H. ANDERSON: I can come. So I said that to my dad and he was kind of worried about it because I didn’t know what to do with myself even
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: and then they didn’t know the situation here either. So I wrote back and told her you can’t do it.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: You can’t come. And then yes and then grandpa finally let used her money to come here.
INTERVIEWER: Oh.
H. ANDERSON: So I was glad for that.
INTERVIEWER: You said your ferry was paid though by…
H. ANDERSON: The friend of my cousin here.
INTERVIEWER: Right.
H. ANDERSON: He met her from here then.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: $176 all the way from home to here.
INTERVIEWER: How did you travel you…?
H. ANDERSON: By boat.
INTERVIEWER: You left from Sundsvall and…
H. ANDERSON: That’s right.
INTERVIEWER: Did you take… How did you get to Copenhagen?
H. ANDERSON: This farmer’s son-in-law he took me and those two girls took me to the train closest train in Sundsvall.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: You know? And from there I went myself to Copenhagen all by myself.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: and…
INTERVIEWER: How old were you about that time?
H. ANDERSON: Going on 21.
INTERVIEWER: What year was that then?
H. ANDERSON: 1926.
INTERVIEWER: I see. So you got a boat and…
H. ANDERSON: Boat in Copenhagen and then…
INTERVIEWER: Go direct to New York?
H. ANDERSON: Direct to New York, yeah.
INTERVIEWER: Alright.
H. ANDERSON: I was sick, seasick all the way.
INTERVIEWER: [Laughter]. How many days was it?
H. ANDERSON: 9 days.
INTERVIEWER: Oh. Was it a big boat or…
H. ANDERSON: Big [unintelligible - 00:08:32] was his name.
INTERVIEWER: [Unintelligible - 00:08:33].
H. ANDERSON: Big, beautiful boat.
INTERVIEWER: Was it bad weather? Is that…
H. ANDERSON: Yes it was the -- it happened to get -- the boat was supposed to be kind roaring along with the waves and there was big waves. There was this comrade, “Oh we had to put…” He saw over there [Unintelligible - 00:08:48]
INTERVIEWER: [Laughter].
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:08:54].
INTERVIEWER: I can sympathize because I was sick when I went over when I was in the army.
H. ANDERSON: Did you?
INTERVIEWER: Both ways. Yes.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah, you know form but anyway. So I went and I got off the boat in New York and I could hardly work because I in bed all the way.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: I was so wobbly and it was like playing drunk.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: And…
INTERVIEWER: So weak then…
H. ANDERSON: Yeah, you’re weak. That’s right and then I took the boat and entered the train [unintelligible - 00:09:23].
INTERVIEWER: You way was paid all the way then, right?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah all the way.
INTERVIEWER: Everything.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah. Like $176
INTERVIEWER: Yes.
H. ANDERSON: it’s not cheap, you know.
INTERVIEWER: Have you gone back on a boat since that time?
H. ANDERSON: Oh yeah. Once in 1937 I went home I stay where I got the appendicitis operation and I couldn’t work for three months. I’m there, I couldn’t work for three months after.
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see.
H. ANDERSON: So he said why don’t you go to… My boss told me if I’m going to take go home now where you can, where you would be resting, he said.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So I took him over, he said a few dollars that I took payment and went to [00:10:00] Sweden.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: In ’37, 1937.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So I had already been married so I had a daughter and everything. So my wife got the units paid [unintelligible - 00:10:12] you know? To keep her going ahead and…
INTERVIEWER: Oh.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah oh.
INTERVIEWER: I see. You went alone.
H. ANDERSON: I went alone.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So I was home three months.
INTERVIEWER: Your folks were still alive then?
H. ANDERSON: My folks are still alive. All my brothers and my sisters were alive.
INTERVIEWER: Did many others in your family then immigrate to America?
H. ANDERSON: No, I was the only one.
INTERVIEWER: You were the only one.
H. ANDERSON: Only one and the oldest of them.
INTERVIEWER: Were there many from that area at all?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah quite a few. I was surprised right from the -- when we were going on a boat there was quite a few whom from Rome you know? Some got off in Chicago and some got off in St. Paul
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: but nobody off headed me because I went straight through
INTERVIEWER: [Unintelligible - 00:10:52].
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:10:53] but the train went right straight through New York to [unintelligible - 00:10:57]. It was pretty good I thought. No change, no nothing.
INTERVIEWER: Oh. Oh I see. Not the Great Northern or?
H. ANDERSON: Great Northern?
INTERVIEWER: Or Northern Pacific?
H. ANDERSON: Northern Pacific I think it was.
INTERVIEWER: Oh yeah. I see.
H. ANDERSON: That’s right.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So I come to previous house there with my cousin in USA he drove an old Essex car.
INTERVIEWER: Oh.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:11:18] snow this deep, you know
INTERVIEWER: [Laughter].
H. ANDERSON: out there but a few days before Christmas so like I stayed in there and he stayed until March, then I come down here. I know I had a friend down here that was from home and he had already come here a year before me and [unintelligible - 00:11:36].
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah you can come down here [unintelligible - 00:11:39] first my cousin gave me a job to put in a few offer a lawyer up in Fergus Falls.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: upstairs on the second floor and I didn’t know how to handle that.
INTERVIEWER: [Laughter].
H. ANDERSON: He was kind of an ombudsman man, you know, but he helped me then to get going. So he gave me $40 from down here then.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So I took and went down here and helped
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: [unintelligible - 00:12:09]
INTERVIEWER: Yes.
H. ANDERSON: and they put me on top of the whole big pile of sand to shovel and stand on. I got totally get myself covered with sand, you know. You just have to do something with because you never do anything from here. He told me afterward that because I didn’t have anything to do for me.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: Instead he just, he picked me up to get something to do.
INTERVIEWER: Was there quite a difference did you notice from the weather in Sweden and we you got to Fergus Falls that way?
H. ANDERSON: Fergus Falls. That was about the same as being home there.
INTERVIEWER: About the same as home.
H. ANDERSON: Sure. And a lot of snow was in there. Lots of snow in my home town. There you had to be [unintelligible - 00:13:01] as you get out to the bar.
INTERVIEWER: Is that right?
H. ANDERSON: I have a sister, only we have determined, had a cold through [unintelligible - 00:13:06].
INTERVIEWER: Oh my!
H. ANDERSON: Yeah.
INTERVIEWER: [Laughter].
H. ANDERSON: So I was used to that.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So, but I would say…
INTERVIEWER: Did they have kind of a short growing season over there?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah it was short, you know.
INTERVIEWER: What did you grow there in crops?
H. ANDERSON: Crops is corn, hay and corn and hay mostly and potatoes and...
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:13:30] it was not easy.
INTERVIEWER: How long did your folks live down in…
H. ANDERSON: Well they lived… in 1937 my dad was gone.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: He was gone then. My mother lived there a few years after that you know?
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: But it was interesting to go home again.
INTERVIEWER: I bet it was.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah it was.
INTERVIEWER: Had it changed much in those few years?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah, not too much for that. All my young people have grown.
INTERVIEWER: Uh-huh.
H. ANDERSON: They have lived yet there and it was fun to be with them.
INTERVIEWER: What happened to your girlfriend that you had there?
H. ANDERSON: Oh yeah. She was so happy. She wanted me to meet her mother. Before I left she’s very discontented. I met her on the yard. “I thought you were going to marry [unintelligible - 00:14:26],” she said. [Unintelligible - 00:14:28] marry her.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: That’s the way it is now, I guess that’s why...
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: When I was here a few years...
INTERVIEWER: But you were already married then weren’t you?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah I was already married there, you know.
INTERVIEWER: Back there, yeah.
H. ANDERSON: That’s right. And she married a guy with name of Andersen
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: and he was a [unintelligible - 00:14:52] so
INTERVIEWER: Oh.
H. ANDERSON: and they didn’t live very long many years after that. I don’t know if he drank too much. I want to talk with her. I do not know [00:15:00] we never hear.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So.
INTERVIEWER: Was that a big problem over in Sweden in those years when you were there, alcohol?
H. ANDERSON: Yes it was. Yes it was. They made it themselves.
INTERVIEWER: They made it themselves.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah. It was the worse problem over the problem.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:15:15] but it’s home anyway.
INTERVIEWER: Yes.
H. ANDERSON: I love to go home, yes and work on my old farm there and you know the stones and stuff.
INTERVIEWER: It’s not in the family anymore I don’t suppose huh?
H. ANDERSON: No, my brother
INTERVIEWER: Oh
H. ANDERSON: kept it [unintelligible - 00:15:32].
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:15:35] he kept it and married and kept it and her daughter and there’s a daughter that’s going the business now
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: and his wife. He’s still living but he has this kind of trouble now with arthritis and stuff you know, so
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: but it’s fun to go home anyway.
INTERVIEWER: Oh I imagine it is, yes.
H. ANDERSON: After all these years too.
INTERVIEWER: How many times have you gone back?
H. ANDERSON: 10, 11 times.
INTERVIEWER: Alright.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah.
INTERVIEWER: I don’t suppose you went by boat anymore [laughter].
H. ANDERSON: No, no, no, no. So…
INTERVIEWER: It was pretty quick now.
H. ANDERSON: No. I don’t take long. Overnight you’re there.
INTERVIEWER: Yes.
H. ANDERSON: It’s fun
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: and during then my wife here now she - she had her folks here. Her father was here before for a few years and then he took over. During this, my wife and her sister Margaret that lives in Chicago and after a few years he took over his wife and the youngest daughter.
INTERVIEWER: I say he came first.
H. ANDERSON: He came first.
INTERVIEWER: What was his name?
H. ANDERSON: Carlson.
INTERVIEWER: Carlson?
H. ANDERSON: Carlie Carlson.
INTERVIEWER: Carlie Carlson.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah. So he took over his wife and his daughter
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: but then his wife did come over and she didn’t like it too well so she went back and she got [unintelligible - 00:16:52] got pregnant.
INTERVIEWER: Oh!
H. ANDERSON: So she went to Sweden and had to have baby boy and they come here a couple years after that and they come back here with little kids. You know they were seen.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: and so we kind of brought him up and they had a place up in Mora over here therefore her father stayed there.
INTERVIEWER: That’s why they settled up in Mora. I see.
H. ANDERSON: That’s right up in Mora. That is ten miles North of Mora on a little this kind of home-made farm that they made there.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: He made carpet that’s why he build a home out there.
INTERVIEWER: Where had they lived in Sweden? Where did they come from in Sweden?
H. ANDERSON: Dalarna.
INTERVIEWER: Where about in Dalarna?
H. ANDERSON: I can’t think of the name. It’s southern part of Dalarna.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: So but…
INTERVIEWER: So going ahead with your wife was born and raised in Dalarna?
H. ANDERSON: Yes uh-huh.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: Yes.
INTERVIEWER: How old was she when she came over?
H. ANDERSON: 16.
INTERVIEWER: 16 and they -- you say you lived on Mora, Minnesota then.
H. ANDERSON: That’s right.
INTERVIEWER: I know there’s a Mora and Dalarna also.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah. There’s just two of them here.
INTERVIEWER: They also have that Vasaloppet there.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that’s right, that’s right. It’s been a good year for us.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm. How did you meet [unintelligible - 00:18:08]?
H. ANDERSON: At the dance hall. There were dances here always.
INTERVIEWER: In those days.
H. ANDERSON: All over the place.
INTERVIEWER: Which hall was that?
H. ANDERSON: It was the hall on [unintelligible - 00:18:17] Lake St. It used to be [unintelligible - 00:18:19].
INTERVIEWER: Oh yes. I know that.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: and I stood… I like to stay about the music and then, you know. So I stood right up there and here. I look across the hall and there stood her and her sister.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: And the first time they’ve been out there too.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: So I can remember I asked that little one for a dance.
INTERVIEWER: [Laughter].
H. ANDERSON: So [unintelligible - 00:18:41] really fat.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: [Laughter]. So I wanted her, I dreamed of her but she did go with me though and I was a pretty good dancer so…
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So after that we have a home together.
INTERVIEWER: Was it love at first sight?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah I would say so.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah [laughter].
H. ANDERSON: Yeah. You bet yeah. You really…
INTERVIEWER: When did you get married then?
H. ANDERSON: In… was it ‘20… ‘27, ‘28
INTERVIEWER: 1928?
H. ANDERSON: ’28 yeah.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: Oh.
INTERVIEWER: That was about two years after you got here.
H. ANDERSON: That’s right.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: It didn’t take long.
INTERVIEWER: That was good.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah.
INTERVIEWER: And you had one child you say?
H. ANDERSON: One daughter.
INTERVIEWER: One daughter.
H. ANDERSON: She is here today.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: She’s 50, 56 I think now, yeah.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah oh.
INTERVIEWER: Do you know when [unintelligible - 00:19:41] was born and what was her birthday?
H. ANDERSON: October 17, 1909.
INTERVIEWER: Oh.
H. ANDERSON: Mm-hmm. Yeah so.
INTERVIEWER: See my birthday is October 18.
H. ANDERSON: Is that so? Oh yeah, I’m June 3rd.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah.
H. ANDERSON: So [00:20:00] you got your birthday the next day.
INTERVIEWER: Yes we’re pretty close. I’ll have to tell her that.
H. ANDERSON: You guys celebrate together.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah.
INTERVIEWER: I was going to ask you when you came down to me in the office and you worked in different places there… When did [unintelligible - 00:20:17] come down from Mora and that…?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah she come there. She did - her father had a brother up north Minneapolis here. Lived here been a long a time before anybody come here.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So they kind of went there and they told them. She helped them to get help from… go to some rich home and get a job, you know, so she work for people here.
INTERVIEWER: That was…
H. ANDERSON: Mm-hmm. Both are [unintelligible - 00:20:51].
INTERVIEWER: That was quite common for the women
H. ANDERSON: Yes it was. Yeah that’s right.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: The older girl than Margaret she went to Chicago
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: and she knows somebody there. She went…So she got a job there and then she got married there
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: and so
INTERVIEWER: So [unintelligible - 00:21:08] worked for some…
H. ANDERSON: Some rich family.
INTERVIEWER: rich family here in Minneapolis?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that’s right here in Minneapolis.
INTERVIEWER: Any of that do you remember the names of them or who they were?
H. ANDERSON: No. I can’t think of any.
INTERVIEWER: Was it over in the Kenwood District or?
H. ANDERSON: No [unintelligible - 00:21:21]. I can’t remember the names.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm. That’s okay.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah but you forget all these years.
INTERVIEWER: Oh sure, sure. You are doing really well remembering all these things.
H. ANDERSON: Well it’s from the same pack I look back at the idea, took back - I took out the papers and looked at them, you know, you have papers when you leave Sweden.
INTERVIEWER: You still have your
H. ANDERSON: Oh yeah.
INTERVIEWER: [unintelligible - 00:21:55]?
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:21:56].
INTERVIEWER: Yes.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:21:58].
INTERVIEWER: Oh.
H. ANDERSON: Then I graduated from school
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: And they said, “Good, good, good.” And everything.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:22:05].
INTERVIEWER: [Laughter].
H. ANDERSON: So you’re kind of fun to look it over.
INTERVIEWER: You were confirmed over there, I just imagined.
H. ANDERSON: That’s right. That’s right.
INTERVIEWER: Was that school that you went to a part of the church?
H. ANDERSON: No.
INTERVIEWER: Was it public school?
H. ANDERSON: No. It was… not a private school, it was a school for everybody.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah, public school.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that’s right. That’s a public school, yeah
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: and then you graduate [unintelligible - 00:22:29]. I think we went there once a month or something like that.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: It took two to three weeks to go through the school day [unintelligible - 00:22:40].
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see.
H. ANDERSON: Oh. Oh.
INTERVIEWER: I know in the old days that they used to be together, the school and…
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that’s right. That’s cool and it turns me on.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So I got his name, his [unintelligible - 00:22:51] was his name, he signed the paper for me
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: [unintelligible - 00:22:56].
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm. What was the church’s [unintelligible - 00:23:01]?
H. ANDERSON: No [unintelligible - 00:23:03].
INTERVIEWER: What was the name of that parish?
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:23:07].
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah.
INTERVIEWER: How do you spell that?
H. ANDERSON: E-T-T-M-E-R.
INTERVIEWER: Okay. Uh-huh.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:23:17].
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So there is where my whole family is buried.
INTERVIEWER: I see, yeah.
H. ANDERSON: So I like to go home and look
INTERVIEWER: Yes that is
H. ANDERSON: [unintelligible - 00:23:28].
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: My first [unintelligible - 00:23:31].
INTERVIEWER: Has anybody ever done a genealogy of your family?
H. ANDERSON: No.
INTERVIEWER: Trace back who are… are they all from that area, all the way back or not?
H. ANDERSON: No, I don’t think anybody know done that. No.
INTERVIEWER: Have you ever heard about [unintelligible - 00:23:44]?
H. ANDERSON: Yes.
INTERVIEWER: The family where they came from.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:23:46] but I haven’t heard anybody
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: I can’t remember anybody who had that.
INTERVIEWER: I see. Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: I still like to go home next year if I leave it.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:24:00] now.
INTERVIEWER: Oh that’s good.
H. ANDERSON: I want to go home once more
INTERVIEWER: Oh good.
H. ANDERSON: and then [unintelligible - 00:24:07] does not want to go anymore. She just doesn’t go anymore.
INTERVIEWER: Does she have relatives over there?
H. ANDERSON: Oh yeah, a lot of cousins [unintelligible - 00:24:13].
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see.
H. ANDERSON: She just doesn’t care to go anymore.
INTERVIEWER: Now it gets a little harder to travel sometimes.
H. ANDERSON: Yes it is harder to travel. You have to pack and unpack.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm. Yes.
H. ANDERSON: but I want to go once more. I can always simply as I possibly can, you know,
INTERVIEWER: Yeah.
H. ANDERSON: All by myself.
INTERVIEWER: Sure oh.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah oh. So we’ll see how the times are.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm. Well now your years here in Minneapolis where did you work?
H. ANDERSON: I worked for [unintelligible - 00:24:43].
INTERVIEWER: Yes.
H. ANDERSON: St. Louis Park
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: [unintelligible - 00:24:48].
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: Then it close up. Towards fall it close up there you know
INTERVIEWER: Oh
H. ANDERSON: they close up there for the winter.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: Most of it there.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So then I went [unintelligible - 00:25:00] and he was from my hometown in Sweden.
INTERVIEWER: What company was this?
H. ANDERSON: Olin Dairy.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: Oh and they had [unintelligible - 00:25:08] 15th and the 22nd St. [unintelligible - 00:25:12].
INTERVIEWER: Oh he was from your hometown there.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that’s right.
INTERVIEWER: What was his first name?
H. ANDERSON: Ernest Olin.
INTERVIEWER: Ernest Olin.
H. ANDERSON: He said, “Yeah you can get a job here. I need you here.” He said so. I got a job. I get up 3 or 4 o’clock in the morning to go out with the drivers. There is 37 drivers we had there.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: Work split shift then I went home and rest for a while and then went back to make butter and cottage cheese.
INTERVIEWER: Mmm.
H. ANDERSON: Until the drivers started coming there I start to check them in and made up the load for the following morning then.
INTERVIEWER: Mmm.
H. ANDERSON: So then I will go down and load them out and day after day like that.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm. What kind of salary did you get in those days?
H. ANDERSON: I think we had $37 a week to start with.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:25:58].
INTERVIEWER: What year was that that you started for them?
H. ANDERSON: 1928. 30 January 1928.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: Oh.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm. Oh.
H. ANDERSON: So [unintelligible - 00:26:09] he took me to this building.
INTERVIEWER: To the institute [unintelligible - 00:26:15]. That’s right.
H. ANDERSON: Nothing going on here with two, three ladies sitting downstairs sewing something and…
INTERVIEWER: [Laughter].
H. ANDERSON: The basement there.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah.
H. ANDERSON: So he took through the whole thing. Then they had furniture upstairs and bedroom set [unintelligible - 00:26:31].
INTERVIEWER: Was this Turnblad’s furniture?
H. ANDERSON: Turnblad’s furniture.
INTERVIEWER: I never heard that they left anything.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:26:37].
INTERVIEWER: What year was this that you came here?
H. ANDERSON: It could’ve been here 1928,’29 probably.
INTERVIEWER: He donated and founded institute in December of 1929.
H. ANDERSON: Uh-huh.
INTERVIEWER: So it could’ve been
H. ANDERSON: Yeah.
INTERVIEWER: shortly thereafter.
H. ANDERSON: Right [unintelligible - 00:26:50].
INTERVIEWER: Oh.
H. ANDERSON: Oh. So only took me down here and it was, you know I was in fancy and you know, Swedish and stuff.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: so and he was more Swede than I was.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: All I did there in Sweden.
INTERVIEWER: Well, do you remember any furnishings here? What was it like? Which bedroom was it…?
H. ANDERSON: They had those steel furniture, iron bed.
INTERVIEWER: Iron bed.
H. ANDERSON: Iron bed [unintelligible - 00:27:14].
INTERVIEWER: Which room had the bed?
H. ANDERSON: I can’t tell you that. I cannot remember which one that would be.
INTERVIEWER: I wouldn’t though. We have a glass room over there now which is labeled as a chamber. I don’t know if that helps.
H. ANDERSON: Oh I cannot remember room,
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: which room it was but there was supposed to be a bedroom and there was a bedroom. Did you see that?
INTERVIEWER: Yeah.
H. ANDERSON: There’s a bedroom.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm and was any furniture in the first floor at all?
H. ANDERSON: No it wasn’t returned.
INTERVIEWER: Not returned, yeah.
H. ANDERSON: There were two or three ladies sitting there so we are doing some
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: They are embroidery or something.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah. Have you met anybody in the Turnblad family?
H. ANDERSON: No.
INTERVIEWER: You had
H. ANDERSON: No.
INTERVIEWER: You ever met
H. ANDERSON: I never met the wife. She lived the longest, you know.
INTERVIEWER: No. You mean the daughter.
H. ANDERSON: The daughter?
INTERVIEWER: Yeah. Yeah that’s right.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah. She lives across the street.
INTERVIEWER: Yes they did.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:28:05].
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: We went there quite often. Then there’s two. Now as often to do now though [laughter].
INTERVIEWER: You’ve seen quite a change in the institute
H. ANDERSON: Yeah.
INTERVIEWER: from that.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah I’ve seen this many change. It’s for the better, you know.
INTERVIEWER: Oh I should say. Well, were you a member then or how was that did you…
H. ANDERSON: No. I didn’t get to be member right away. You need to be actually married, then we got to members. Yeah, you know? So…
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: And what more doing is that he said that we could come to her and
INTERVIEWER: Yes.
H. ANDERSON: So
INTERVIEWER: Mmm.
H. ANDERSON: So but it was kind of dead before they got going.
INTERVIEWER: [Laughter]. When did things start moving there you think? What years?
H. ANDERSON: 1940 probably.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah I see. Oh yeah.
H. ANDERSON: That should take to be about that time.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: We got members.
INTERVIEWER: Yes.
H. ANDERSON: So, it’s been interesting all the way.
INTERVIEWER: Yes. How long did you work for Olin by the way?
H. ANDERSON: 40 years almost.
INTERVIEWER: 40 years.
H. ANDERSON: After this full 3 months.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: 40 years.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm. That company grew during those years.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah they grew [unintelligible - 00:29:11].
INTERVIEWER: Did you work inside all the time?
H. ANDERSON: Worked 13 years inside
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see.
H. ANDERSON: and then I told them, I’m going to get out because I don’t want to work here because you’re wet up to here.
INTERVIEWER: Oh I suppose.
H. ANDERSON: You know, in the bed and the ice box there.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: So he said, “No can’t do this. You can’t leave me. You can’t leave [unintelligible - 00:29:34]
INTERVIEWER: Oh.
H. ANDERSON: [unintelligible - 00:29:36].
INTERVIEWER: I see. 27th avenue?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that’s right and on to the river.
INTERVIEWER: From Lake Street to…
H. ANDERSON: Yeah [unintelligible - 00:29:51].
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see [unintelligible - 00:29:53] wasn’t very well built up, was it?
H. ANDERSON: No, it wasn’t very bad build but it was pretty
INTERVIEWER: It’s starting to grow then.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that’s right [00:30:00] and they were the nicest people there [unintelligible - 00:30:02].
INTERVIEWER: Yes. It was a residential area.
H. ANDERSON: That’s right and as you get to know them it’s just like you belong to the family, you know,
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: Somehow there.
INTERVIEWER: [Laughter].
H. ANDERSON: So I enjoyed it.
INTERVIEWER: I bet. You like dealing with people?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that’s right. I like to deal and talk to people
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:0:17].
INTERVIEWER: It sound like you like being active too that way?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that’s [unintelligible - 00:30:20] used to be outside [unintelligible - 00:30:24].
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:30:26] I was already ready to quit then.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: I hear that [unintelligible - 00:30:32] good enough to give me a job
INTERVIEWER: Yes.
H. ANDERSON: but I needed it so bad
INTERVIEWER: Yeah.
H. ANDERSON: and his wife said, “You can’t quit here. You can’t quit.”
INTERVIEWER: [Laughter].
H. ANDERSON: So I worked there for almost 40 years.
INTERVIEWER: 40 years. Did you get a pension from them at all?
H. ANDERSON: I got a pension from them.
INTERVIEWER: They still have…?
H. ANDERSON: A little bit of a pension from [unintelligible - 00:30:53].
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah. That’s right. That’s right.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: By in a month pretty much.
INTERVIEWER: Was that the horses then at first?
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:31:05] come in there. I remember he got rid of that. He had a team left there.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: when I started there.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm. When you started as a milk driver you did not have horses on?
H. ANDERSON: No. We had the trucks he bought. He bought 20 cab.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: Cab drivers.
INTERVIEWER: Oh, oh.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah. Whole cabs
INTERVIEWER: Oh.
H. ANDERSON: and he fixed him over to trucks.
INTERVIEWER: Oh [laughter].
H. ANDERSON: So we drive trucks and then we were standing up driving and there he went into the canal and snow was there.
INTERVIEWER: That was quite a reconstruction to make
H. ANDERSON: Yeah it was.
INTERVIEWER: a cab into a truck.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah he did. By the way, cheaper than to buy a whole
INTERVIEWER: Oh.
H. ANDERSON: whole bunch of truck, you know.
INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm.
H. ANDERSON: Garage was on Franklin there and fifteen truck [unintelligible - 00:31:52].
INTERVIEWER: Hmm.
INTERVIEWER: Have you been members of any other organizations?
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:00:06].
INTERVIEWER: That’s where you did the…
[CROSSTALK]
INTERVIEWER: Is that organization still active?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah, it is still active.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: I’m still paying dues there.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: We have been there for I don’t know how long but we are trying be our own [unintelligible - 00:00:15] all the time so.
INTERVIEWER: Yes.
H. ANDERSON: And [unintelligible - 00:00:27] you get tired and…
[CROSSTALK]
INTERVIEWER: Yeah you open a year [unintelligible - 00:00:31]…
[CROSSTALK]
H. ANDERSON: Yeah, you bet I’m fifty three you know.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah.
H. ANDERSON: So that’s…
INTERVIEWER: You belong to any the other organizations?
H. ANDERSON: No that’s all, that’s all.
INTERVIEWER: How about religious organization…
H. ANDERSON: Church, church, church yeah.
INTERVIEWER: You belong to a church?
H. ANDERSON: No, yes.
INTERVIEWER: What attorney [unintelligible - 00:00:47] church on?
H. ANDERSON: On [unintelligible - 00:00:50]…
INTERVIEWER: Twice [unintelligible - 00:00:52]?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah whole trinity [unintelligible - 00:00:53] church.
INTERVIEWER: Yes I know that one.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:00:55], they belong there but I don’t know how many old a long time, long time.
H. ANDERSON: Yes.
INTERVIEWER: Close to 34 years.
H. ANDERSON: Were you married there or?
INTERVIEWER: No we were married here there and then we didn’t get married we just, just went through just some minister and he married us and …
H. ANDERSON: Oh I see.
INTERVIEWER: They didn’t have no big deal in them days. No, be here belong to church or any church or anything you know you [unintelligible - 00:01:18] granted Baptist minister.
H. ANDERSON: Oh, was he Swedish Baptist?
INTERVIEWER: He was kind of Swedish yeah.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah?
INTERVIEWER: Yeah.
H. ANDERSON: So and then it turned out there were 18.
INTERVIEWER: Oh sure. How about organizations here in the institute itself, did you belong to the sales [unintelligible - 00:01:38] sales…
H. ANDERSON: No, no, no, no I didn’t belong to that.
INTERVIEWER: I see any other …
H. ANDERSON: I’d say club that he belonged to you know …
INTERVIEWER: She belongs to the [unintelligible - 00:01:47].
H. ANDERSON: That’s all there, that’s all.
INTERVIEWER: Well, how long you belong to the institute then?
H. ANDERSON: God it must be 30 years.
INTERVIEWER: 30 years.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:02:01] 30 years and.
INTERVIEWER: You’ve seen a lot of change in those years.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah, I've seen a lot change, seen a lot of change.
INTERVIEWER: What's been the biggest change that you noticed?
H. ANDERSON: Down the basement that time it’s the biggest change.
INTERVIEWER: The brand new…
H. ANDERSON: Yah brand new down there…
INTERVIEWER: Auditorium?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that’s right, there was like you walking in to a basement ordinary basement I recall.
INTERVIEWER: Yes, you remember before they made the auditorium when you are old, in the house itself and the basement over here?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah …
INTERVIEWER: There was a – kind of like a gymnasium there they said?
H. ANDERSON: That’s right tell you what, we did all this cooking in the [unintelligible - 00:02:37] student …
INTERVIEWER: Yes.
H. ANDERSON: Everything was done in there, the kitchen [unintelligible - 00:02:41] holding up all the stock of the food you know to people help themselves…
INTERVIEWER: Yeah.
H. ANDERSON: You get to eat your plate there.
INTERVIEWER: What was the basement like when you first saw it there down there?
H. ANDERSON: I told you it looked like there is no basement.
INTERVIEWER: It wasn’t …?
H. ANDERSON: No there’s nothing pretty about it or nice about it you know.
INTERVIEWER: Oh I understood there was a recreation room there that he had built [unintelligible - 00:03:03]?
H. ANDERSON: No I can’t remember that.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: No, I can’t remember that.
INTERVIEWER: And there was where another coffee is still there, it’s down below there was a part of a gymnasium.
H. ANDERSON: That’s what it said.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah.
[CROSSTALK]
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:03:14] you didn’t get around to see all but he took me to the – I mean we had to get in through that door, back door then, then we got in to the basement and [unintelligible - 00:03:24] type of ladies and we are sitting and sewing and…
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: So [unintelligible - 00:03:28], and went up through the upstairs second floor there were some bedrooms. A lot of the – had a lot of stuff here then I don’t know what happened to all that beds and stuff.
INTERVIEWER: You must have seen it when before they moved across the street?
H. ANDERSON: Yes I’m sure [unintelligible - 00:03:46] once before they moved it across the street, I don’t know what happened to them or …
INTERVIEWER: Yeah.
H. ANDERSON: Somebody must have taken them.
INTERVIEWER: Do you recall if the ceilings were decorated, now we have them decorated but all the years have painted them plain, at that time could you remember what they looked like at all the ceilings?
H. ANDERSON: No …
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: No, no, no, no see we went there, he took us over that time over there and after that program wasn’t here for years.
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see, yeah.
H. ANDERSON: Before I joined in here. So it’s a pretty hard to …
INTERVIEWER: Was Mr. Olean a member of the board or something?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah, he was a member of the -- I don’t know if he’s a member of the board but he was a member of the institute.
INTERVIEWER: He was a member of the institute?
H. ANDERSON: Oh yeah …
INTERVIEWER: The membership I understand was very small …
H. ANDERSON: Yeah there was just a few that stayed but when he was a member and he was a real Swede, he was as much Swedish …
INTERVIEWER: Did he like to talk Swede with you then?
H. ANDERSON: Oh yeah …
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: You know Swedish oh yeah he was very nice, very nice to work in the [unintelligible - 00:04:52] you know he had much so he give me some extra money and the extra, I could take home some butter [00:05:00] and stuff like that you know.
INTERVIEWER: For now how was transition from to come over here and learn English, how did you learn English?
H. ANDERSON: Well people up here I went to school in Fergus Falls.
INTERVIEWER: Oh did you, oh.
H. ANDERSON: And I went to school here, you know the 30 the late 30 from 11 …
INTERVIEWER: Was this a night school or something like that or?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah evening school.
INTERVIEWER: Evening school?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah.
INTERVIEWER: I see, was it in English learning?
H. ANDERSON: English learning English yeah.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:05:29] and so that’s how I picked it up.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: Now.
INTERVIEWER: How about then your home then when you’re up and were married and your daughter?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah.
INTERVIEWER: Did you keep speaking Swedish or did you …?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah we do that today up to date.
INTERVIEWER: You do it today.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah we are, we talk Swedish to each other, you [unintelligible - 00:05:45] fits in.
INTERVIEWER: Sure, yes.
H. ANDERSON: Though it’s a -- I think it’s more English though and Swedish but we talk, we talk too loud between the wife and I we talk louder.
INTERVIEWER: All right.
H. ANDERSON: Swedish.
INTERVIEWER: Sure keep it up that way.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah, she is better at it than I am and you forget you know, after to be 60 years now, yes you know most.
INTERVIEWER: But you don’t have no problem though?
H. ANDERSON: No, No I don’t have no way to come back home right away.
INTERVIEWER: Yes, yes.
H. ANDERSON: And so and really so easy that we are going to Portland Oregon and that’s probably – most probably June, to [unintelligible - 00:06:27] Minneapolis.
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see.
H. ANDERSON: And there are having 60th wedding anniversary. So we told her, call them and told me from Oklahoma, you come in on Monday or go home on Friday we talk. No you can go home you know it’s our wedding anniversary. You know we’ve done their wedding here.
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see.
H. ANDERSON: You Know so …
INTERVIEWER: So you had your 60th on too?
H. ANDERSON: No that would be next year I’ll be 60.
INTERVIEWER: So next year you have your 60.
H. ANDERSON: No.
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see.
H. ANDERSON: We’re married to have that a year ahead. So we plan to go there.
INTERVIEWER: Did you – you took up citizenship too I suppose?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah I got that papers over here.
INTERVIEWER: Why didn’t you do that?
H. ANDERSON: I did that well right away I started [unintelligible - 00:07:15].
INTERVIEWER: Yeah.
H. ANDERSON: Because you had to be everything part of the [unintelligible - 00:07:18] talked about your [unintelligible - 00:07:20] and inherit. All that the paper found out they got the flag that they got with the papers.
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah.
INTERVIEWER: While you were doing some study in there…
H. ANDERSON: All we did was study in there you know and when time…
INTERVIEWER: Evening – evening classes…
H. ANDERSON: Yeah I tried the evening classes yeah.
INTERVIEWER: Did you get that here in Minneapolis?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah in Minneapolis yeah, in the court house.
INTERVIEWER: I see, was there a judge that presided?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that’s right…
INTERVIEWER: Remember who it was?
H. ANDERSON: No I can’t remember him I don’t know.
INTERVIEWER: Is gun hill also got her papers?
H. ANDERSON: Oh yeah, oh yeah we had to have the paper.
INTERVIEWER: Yes.
H. ANDERSON: So but it’s yeah it’s a little – little bit to do first you come here you know, so you stay here.
INTERVIEWER: Sure, sure, sure.
H. ANDERSON: You know and enjoy it.
INTERVIEWER: But did you find English language kind of hard to?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah at first it was kind of awkward to talk.
INTERVIEWER: Yes.
H. ANDERSON: You know but now it’s, you still don’t read to talk right but you understand, you understand about it anyway.
INTERVIEWER: Yes.
H. ANDERSON: So I wanted to so.
INTERVIEWER: Did you take any other evening classes at all…
H. ANDERSON: No, no.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: No, no. You talked about going to dances can maybe dances they were all over town here.
INTERVIEWER: Did you get to Daniel Hall and?
H. ANDERSON: Yes…
INTERVIEWER: [Unintelligible - 00:08:40] scrapped [unintelligible - 00:08:41] and his bunch?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah we are; we were there too.
INTERVIEWER: I see, remember.
H. ANDERSON: [Norway] Hall and also [Paton] Hall.
INTERVIEWER: Where was that now?
H. ANDERSON: On 29th in Chicago.
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see.
H. ANDERSON: Right [unintelligible - 00:08:52] that was in [unintelligible - 00:08:53] there.
INTERVIEWER: Yes?
H. ANDERSON: Yes, so [unintelligible - 00:08:57] have you been there? You’d love to go to dance in [unintelligible - 00:09:02].
INTERVIEWER: You still do that?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah only if I can.
INTERVIEWER: Maybe you get up here and then I and I know - I’ve tried them I’ve had some Scandinavian music and…
H. ANDERSON: We belong to clubbiest I forgot to tell you [unintelligible - 00:09:14]
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see.
H. ANDERSON: And the wife was the chairman for that for many years.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: And we met on 29th in Seattle and that…
INTERVIEWER: [Unintelligible - 00:09:27].
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that’s right, met there for [unintelligible - 00:09:30] years, but the thing is I had to pay all summer for nothing that I didn’t use them used their offer anything all summer stay for months there, $55 a month, so now we have decided to come here.
INTERVIEWER: Are they still in our existence?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah, [unintelligible - 00:09:48].
INTERVIEWER: Meets here?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah we’ve already started meeting this – this last Saturday was our last meeting over there.
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see.
H. ANDERSON: So we asked him, we asked [unintelligible - 00:09:58] yes he said why don’t you try it he said. I give you plenty time to see if it works, he said, so we are going to try this coming month.
INTERVIEWER: How many are in there now at this time?
H. ANDERSON: We have 50 of us, 50 of us there that was last Saturday.
INTERVIEWER: They are all, from the dollar an hour.
H. ANDERSON: Well they are not all of them.
INTERVIEWER: Not all of them.
H. ANDERSON: It is a few, very few.
INTERVIEWER: Oh I see, it is not [unintelligible -0:10:27].
H. ANDERSON: No, no you did that but they come in to dance with the music and you bring stuff like that, we have fun there. On Saturday afternoon we used to have it in the evening. Saturday evening, but you know the people are getting older and they cannot get around, and drive on this and every Saturday.
INTERVIEWER: Oh, I see.
H. ANDERSON: So that is why we are going to have [unintelligible -0:10:55] next month, this is going to be the first month towards the sale
INTERVIEWER: Well the institute has changed because it’s the center for many different groups that meet here now.
H. ANDERSON: That’s right.
INTERVIEWER: That’s good to keep the Swedish Heritage.
H. ANDERSON: They should be here in the first place.
INTERVIEWER: So that was the turn blocks intention and when he found that the institute was that would be the center of Scandinavian or Swedish activities that was a wonderful gift that he…
H. ANDERSON: Yeah, it was unbelievable.
INTERVIEWER: Beautiful, beautiful home, Mansion.
H. ANDERSON: Surprising. He had his head held high up and…
INTERVIEWER: Yes, it cost money, of course.
H. ANDERSON: It cost money and that kind [unintelligible -0:11:39].
INTERVIEWER: You have certainly been active with the institute and so many different…
H. ANDERSON: We use to dinners and we have to go in the shopping hall down with their kid put it there and stuff like this. We’re having that but we’ve done just quite a few years.
INTERVIEWER: Yes.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible -0:11:57]
INTERVIEWER: Like today.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah, like today.
INTERVIEWER: What are they doing there today now?
H. ANDERSON: There is a couple that is going to get married.
INTERVIEWER: Are they going to get married here, or is it just the reception?
H. ANDERSON: Afterwards, they get married in the same quarter.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible -0:12:17]
INTERVIEWER: [Unintelligible -0:12:19]
H. ANDERSON: That’s right, and then tomorrow night the wedding.
INTERVIEWER: Friday night.
H. ANDERSON: Friday night.
INTERVIEWER: I see. I don’t know if I mentioned the date here, today is April 6th
H. ANDERSON: 6th.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah, I didn’t mention it I think at the start.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah.
INTERVIEWER: Well you had also a wonderful experience one summer day I heard about that.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah, yeah it’s the king that they’re talking about that they called us in the spring from here...
INTERVIEWER: What year was this? Do you remember what year it was?
H. ANDERSON: 1982.
INTERVIEWER: Oh, is that long already? Seven years?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah, 82 that was it.
INTERVIEWER: Oh, I see. So who called you out in the spring then?
H. ANDERSON: Young, you know, he was young doctor.
INTERVIEWER: Oh, young. Doctor [Laughren].
H. ANDERSON: That is right he was the one who got the school [unintelligible -0:13:11].
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: He called us in the spring and told us we are going to have, the king and queen invited to come and see you. Are you crazy? I said no way, no way, so in the phone he called again, he said be nice the king is coming so be sure to be home. [Unintelligible -0:13:39] well be home if you’re going to come. So we went a minute home for dinner and we come back by three o'clock and head about four o’clock to come [unintelligible -0:13:43] the king and the queen and torn in to party.
INTERVIEWER: Where did you put them all?
H. ANDERSON: We put them in the garage, [unintelligible -0:13:56] homemade [unintelligible -0:14:01].
INTERVIEWER: The king and the queen came inside.
H. ANDERSON: The king and the queen, and I had a daughter and son in law.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: Should come in. That’s all that could come in there.
INTERVIEWER: And did you speak in Swedish or English?
H. ANDERSON: Swedish.
INTERVIEWER: Swedish.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah we sit down on the sofa and I said you going to drink, yeah that will be awesome, that would be good.
INTERVIEWER: What kind of a drink was that?
H. ANDERSON: We had whisky.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: He loved that.
INTERVIEWER: Did the queen have some too?
H. ANDERSON: No, she did not.
INTERVIEWER: Oh, I see, I see.
H. ANDERSON: But she kind of smoke she said oh yeah I said I shouldn't turn him down
INTERVIEWER: Yeah.
H. ANDERSON: They wanted to know how we got along and how we got here and you know something like this.
INTERVIEWER: Like what we have been doing today?
H. ANDERSON: That is right, that is right. And what we’ve been doing the all day. He had ask the government home in Sweden if he could stop and see somebody that had come here years ago and how they got along and how they got started. So he was supposed to stay I heard 40-45 minutes [0:15:00] I think he said way over and hour.
INTERVIEWER: Well that must have been really interesting.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah he was, he had some books of the king and queen pictured on the front the book there and some went through there until there a day and was the picture of both of them when they were going outside of their house. Today pictures are along the hall.
INTERVIEWER: It’s the recent book that was published?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah a recent book that was published
INTERVIEWER: In Sweden?
H. ANDERSON: It sold off now.
INTERVIEWER: In Sweden?
H. ANDERSON: Here
INTERVIEWER: Oh, I see.
H. ANDERSON: I wasn’t surprised to see our pictures in there.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah I imagine, it must have been quite a thrill to have them come to your home
H. ANDERSON: Yeah it was nice and they were such a nice people that was there. So my wife, he showed there outside the house and he kissed the king and yeah she was here. It was really fun.
INTERVIEWER: Yes. And so there was a …
H. ANDERSON: Yeah she was this is great than anybody else
INTERVIEWER: And wonderful.
H. ANDERSON: And they asked if they wanted to go show through the house and see the house so they went through and both went through the house.
INTERVIEWER: Where were you living then?
H. ANDERSON: 50th street and 16th avenue.
INTERVIEWER: What was the address?
H. ANDERSON: 5020 16th Avenue.
INTERVIEWER: Had you lived there for many years?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah we lived there for 34 years I think.
INTERVIEWER: I see, and then you are.
H. ANDERSON: and then I told my heart you know, and so we talked about it. She is not until we even turn [unintelligible -0:16:44] apartment building.
INTERVIEWER: Oh, I see.
H. ANDERSON: But that is why I failed me because…
INTERVIEWER: I imagine so.
H. ANDERSON: I have never lived in an apartment building and I have nothing to do if it’s hopeless, kind of getting used to it.
INTERVIEWER: Well you are down here and you’re active.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that is right I have to come down here as much as I can and to this time I used to board quite a bit. I used to board before I had this pace maker.
INTERVIEWER: Oh, you have a pace maker, when was that done?
H. ANDERSON: Over the past three month ago.
INTERVIEWER: Three months ago, oh I see.
H. ANDERSON: [unintelligible -0:17:16] the blood is not strong enough to pump through the body and now they pump and they pump strongly then. Pump for me and now it’s sixty, two sixty all the time.
INTERVIEWER: You feel better huh?
H. ANDERSON: Oh yeah. I’m definitely fine.
INTERVIEWER: That’s good.
H. ANDERSON: It’s unbelievable what they can do there.
INTERVIEWER: And that is something…
H. ANDERSON: Less is always less in a way.
INTERVIEWER: How long does a pace maker last?
H. ANDERSON: It could last 13 years.
INTERVIEWER: Thirteen years, oh my goodness.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah.
INTERVIEWER: I didn’t realize [unintelligible -0:17:49].
H. ANDERSON: It guarantees 13 years.
INTERVIEWER: Where are you living now and [unintelligible -0:17:54]?
H. ANDERSON: 912 in [unintelligible -0:17:57].
INTERVIEWER: I see an apartment.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah an apartment.
INTERVIEWER: That is quiet a huge change from being in a home all the years but it is easier…well it’s easier I imagine.
H. ANDERSON: It is easier nothing [unintelligible -0:18:07] and the office is right down talking to my doctors and everything.
INTERVIEWER: You still drive though?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah I drive, I love to drive.
INTERVIEWER: Do you take any trips to town?
H. ANDERSON: No not that long trip with the car if you do it over here you have to go through pre wedding, my grandson is getting married in, what do you call this town, California.
INTERVIEWER: In California?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah,
INTERVIEWER: I think Los Angeles and San Diego and San Francisco…
H. ANDERSON: San Francisco,
INTERVIEWER: San Francisco, I see.
H. ANDERSON: We are going there end of June she is getting married and then from there we flying to Portland.
INTERVIEWER: Oh, that is the same time then; have a nice trip then.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah, that would be a nice trip.
INTERVIEWER: Well that would be mid-summer day you will be spending …
H. ANDERSON: That right, that’s right, but this couple used to live here and as far as you go home they want you to stay for the wedding and you’re going there too, you might as well as long as we’re there.
INTERVIEWER: Speaking of Midsummer Day, do you remember that celebration back home at all?
H. ANDERSON: No, no. Not too much, didn’t hear much of that Midsummer Day.
INTERVIEWER: More recent years that they celebrated that?
H. ANDERSON: No, no. [Unintelligible -0:19:31] so much in my home town [unintelligible -0:19:35] small purchase and set around the entrance of the house and that is the part I celebrated I can remember.
INTERVIEWER: That was situated in the far North enough so that you had quite a bit of daylight there.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible -0:19:55] northern part of Sweden.
INTERVIEWER: What did they call [00:20:00] that area?
H. ANDERSON: Up mash [unintelligible - 00:20:02].
INTERVIEWER: But the general area is called I know…
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:20:09] Medelpad.
INTERVIEWER: Medelpad okay, that’s the land?
H. ANDERSON: Yes that’s right yeah.
INTERVIEWER: And [unintelligible - 00:20:16] Norrbotten they call it?
H. ANDERSON: Yes but not too far from there.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: They were way up, way up [unintelligible - 00:20:23]. Do you have relative from there?
INTERVIEWER: Do I?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah.
INTERVIEWER: Yes I am in Dalsland, my folks came from Dalsland.
H. ANDERSON: You've been home this [unintelligible - 00:20:34].
INTERVIEWER: Yes I've been back twice.
H. ANDERSON: Good.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah I'd like to go again.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah.
INTERVIEWER: My wife's folks also came from Darlana.
H. ANDERSON: Oh, Really?
INTERVIEWER: And I have done a family genealogy so I have traced my families back there in to the 1500s.
H. ANDERSON: Well how nice.
INTERVIEWER: Parts of it both sides of the families.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah well that’s nice to hear.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah it is.
H. ANDERSON: And kids. You know do you have any?
INTERVIEWER: Yeah well I have given them but…
[CROSSTALK]
H. ANDERSON: That’s right, very nice.
INTERVIEWER: So Now let's see here now, I'll ask -- we were just discussing to -- you were talking of my folks of course came from Sweden and I just admire them, coming and with a strange country, strange culture, different language and so forth and how they made it out I just don’t know. So you've experienced that and…
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that’s right [unintelligible - 00:21:34].
INTERVIEWER: Do you have anything in that culture that bother you at all over here was different?
H. ANDERSON: No not [unintelligible - 00:21:40]. Not a thing, I've been lucky with my health and everything in [unintelligible - 00:21:47].
INTERVIEWER: Were you kept a kind of relationship or [unintelligible - 00:21:52] Sweden through your organizations and your dancing and things like that. So you have the…
H. ANDERSON: We had come in touch that way.
INTERVIEWER: Do you still keep in your home the different customs or celebrations like [unintelligible - 00:22:08] and things like that?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah we have [unintelligible - 00:22:11] that here [unintelligible - 00:22:11].
INTERVIEWER: And you home do you?
H. ANDERSON: That right.
INTERVIEWER: Daniel is a [unintelligible - 00:22:15] cook?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah and [unintelligible - 00:22:16] so they [unintelligible - 00:22:22] days of the year Christmas and new year something like that. So we get together with them.
INTERVIEWER: Has your daughter kept these traditions too?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that’s right [unintelligible - 00:22:36].
INTERVIEWER: Your son in law?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that’s right he's a German but he try always he’s like a Swedish now.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah.
H. ANDERSON: He’s a really nice guy and they take the word about us you know that trip, they put a long trip. So they unite that way.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah sure.
H. ANDERSON: They'd be flying [unintelligible - 00:22:58].
INTERVIEWER: Yeah right.
H. ANDERSON: But they come to her and ask her for things you know that…
INTERVIEWER: [Unintelligible - 00:23:08]?
H. ANDERSON: Yes. Cooks there supposed to be how to do this and how to do that. Because we had that for many years here that we have with this [unintelligible - 00:23:23].
INTERVIEWER: You said she worked where did she work you say?
H. ANDERSON: Minneapolis - Moline.
INTERVIEWER: I see. What does she do there?
H. ANDERSON: She works in the foundry.
INTERVIEWER: She was?
H. ANDERSON: Yeah.
INTERVIEWER: My. How about that?
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:23:34] 47 years. I really couldn’t tell you what she did but she was there for 27 year you know.
INTERVIEWER: That was the -- does she get a pension from them? That Company closed out, you know.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah, they closed out. That’s the big closures you know?
INTERVIEWER: Yes yeah, I know somebody that was with them and they kind of some half of the pension I believe.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah. They didn’t get no pension.
INTERVIEWER: No any pension at all yeah. Well it's a good thing we've had social security out.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that’s right that’s for sure, yeah we are.
INTERVIEWER: Yes.
H. ANDERSON: It's was for ten days it was the [unintelligible - 00:24:13]. You know, so now it's…
INTERVIEWER: You went through the depression years but you have a job.
H. ANDERSON: They had a job [unintelligible - 00:24:22] they had the milk job that was the best there was.
INTERVIEWER: I guess so, what kind of a salary did you get there?
H. ANDERSON: About $40 I think you [unintelligible - 00:24:30] the end of the day, then I had commission on the [unintelligible - 00:24:33] you know.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: Commission [unintelligible - 00:24:35] so may points [unintelligible - 00:24:41].
INTERVIEWER: You don’t see many milk men around do you?
H. ANDERSON: No, no.
INTERVIEWER: [Unintelligible - 00:24:46]
H. ANDERSON: Yeah it was the thing in them days you know.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah there was a lot of other people like that, that were like -- I think we had a [unintelligible - 00:24:57] man, a bread man or something.
H. ANDERSON: Ice man [00:25:00] and everything you know, there was coal men deliver coal to your house [unintelligible - 00:25:03] time have changed but it's for the best I guess.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah.
H. ANDERSON: There were but we live in that two bedroom apartment now and it’s kind of – it was so hard and I guess this –
INTERVIEWER: Yes I can see that. I’m having the same problem. I have a home but I am alone so I have to decide what to do someday.
H. ANDERSON: You’re all alone huh?
INTERVIEWER: Yeah.
H. ANDERSON: You’re like that through year.
INTERVIEWER: Yes. It’s seven years now.
H. ANDERSON: Is that so?
INTERVIEWER: Yeah.
H. ANDERSON: Why did they give you something to do when you’re away?
INTERVIEWER: Yes. I don’t worry about what things to do.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah. It was attempting me but always…
INTERVIEWER: But I can sympathize with you at the apartment. Yes.
H. ANDERSON: Take away for a while underestimate the apartment. You know, it’s fine okay, if you know but and I didn’t feel good either. I was kind of sick then.
INTERVIEWER: Is that the first serious illness you had was it…
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:26:17]. Yeah, it was the hard days.
INTERVIEWER: Daniel has been pretty good.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah she's been pretty good, lately she has had trouble with they call it , blood stroke you know. She…
INTERVIEWER: I'm not familiar with that.
H. ANDERSON: I don’t me either you don’t know what is but then her eyes went, woke up one morning, her eyes went black, it was black, she couldn't see. And then it cleared up but now it's a little bit left in the corner here, so I take medicine that’s what it is to think it will clear up. But there is also a stroke that comes back of the neck area.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: So she was here yesterday she was at the hospital check up on her drugs.
INTERVIEWER: I see she walks at the book handle.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah she's there every Wednesday.
INTERVIEWER: Every Wednesday.
H. ANDERSON: When I'm with her here then, like yesterday I took the coffee shop nobody showed up for coffee here.
INTERVIEWER: I see.
H. ANDERSON: Because it said….
INTERVIEWER: Serve coffee.
H. ANDERSON: Serve coffee. I thought I wouldn’t call in.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah, that’s right.
H. ANDERSON: Yes, there is. If you call in.
INTERVIEWER: No I guess that's with volunteers you know [unintelligible - 00:27:30].
H. ANDERSON: That’s right it's free.
INTERVIEWER: Still they should…
H. ANDERSON: I think if you should call in they are going to come.
INTERVIEWER: Yes that’s true.
H. ANDERSON: You can’t deny they accept the coffee in case they were late coming in so they were all set and you know, when you come in but nobody saw that [unintelligible - 00:27:44].
INTERVIEWER: Alright or it's great to having people like you and I don’t know how institute would operate without you.
H. ANDERSON: I know how to operate on anybody here.
[CROSSTALK]
INTERVIEWER: All these volunteers. That’s right.
H. ANDERSON: That’s impossible that this would fall down like if this will quit. You can't do that, if you want to keep it going.
INTERVIEWER: Well they certainly have done a lot to the building and they've put it up and there's a brand new [unintelligible - 00:28:12] is just…
H. ANDERSON: It's really nice isn’t it?
INTERVIEWER: Wonderful.
H. ANDERSON: You bet that was a big thing and they needed it.
INTERVIEWER: Yes, so I'm sure Mr. [Unintelligible - 00:28:22] will be very happy to see you.
H. ANDERSON: Oh, I bet Yeah.
INTERVIEWER: Going pretty good.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah I bet yeah. So this kind of road keeps going I suppose but...
INTERVIEWER: Well can you think of anything else you'd like to mention about?
H. ANDERSON: No [unintelligible - 00:28:40].
INTERVIEWER: I certainly appreciate your taking the time to do this and on behalf of the archives committee thank you so much.
H. ANDERSON: [Unintelligible - 00:28:49]. I've told you everything I know, I can't think of anything else.
INTERVIEWER: Yeah well their wonderful hearing your story.
H. ANDERSON: Yeah that's it.
INTERVIEWER: And the best to you and all.
H. ANDERSON: Thank you very I hope we can live a few more years.
INTERVIEWER: Yes.
H. ANDERSON: How about I come to Sweden [unintelligible - 00:29:05].
INTERVIEWER: Okay very good [unintelligible - 00:29:07].
H. ANDERSON: Thank you.